Five Ways to Protect Your Yard from Wildlife

We’ve lived in our lil’ dream home for almost 3 years now. Just over an acre of land that backs up to a wooded preserve. Sounds nice, right? We DO love it, but it presents its own set of challenges, one called WILDLIFE that we were reminded of over the weekend. Not only did we find part of our new landscaping removed (and raccoon paw-prints everywhere), but we also heard multiple coyotes howling just beyond the tree line after dark. Sandhill cranes, hawks, snakes and the occasional loose cow are all a pretty common sight in our yard, so we have to take some extra precautions to keep our property safe for the twins!

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Maybe you can relate? If your landscaping is lavish and green, chances are you get intruders who pick on your plants or come to quench their thirst on you water fountain. Whereas, this spectacle brings life to your yard, the critters can destroy your pricey investment. For example, a squirrel may burrow onto your underground tubing and start a leak. Fixing such a leak may require that you remodel your backyard, which is quite expensive. How then do you protect your yard from such intrusive wildlife?

Plant Garlic Alongside Your Flower Plants

Yes, small animals, especially squirrels and raccoons detest the smell of garlic. As they come for your flowers at night, the garlic cloves will deter them from causing more damage. With time, these intelligent creatures will now which yards have garlic and will always avoid them. Besides, it’s a great way to grow your own garlic and enjoy cooking from farm to pan. 

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Five Ways to Help Wildlife from Your Own Garden

Most of us are worried about the effect humans have on the environment and wildlife, but many of us think we can’t do anything about it. This isn’t the case, as there are a few things you can do to encourage diversity and give nature a helping hand without even leaving your home.

Offer fresh water

beautiful closeup photo of purple waterlilies in a small pond

While animals are pretty good at finding clean water to drink when it’s available, they can have a hard time in winter and summer when supplies either freeze or dry up. 

Keep a birdbath or a small pond in your garden and make sure it’s topped up and freely available, even if you need to use a small heater to stop it freezing. You’ll be helping birds, lizards and small mammals, as long as the water isn’t near a place that a predator could launch an attack from.

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