Going Downtown

I’ve lived in quite a variety of areas in my lifetime. Suburbs, city, country, apartment, house, dorm…the list goes on. Right now we live in a house out in the country, where the loudest noise we hear are the cows mooing in the pasture next door. So when I visit a friend in the city, it always tends to give me a little bit of excitement. The city sounds. The fast pace. The ease of accessibility. Very different locations, yes, but so many positives to each, depending on your family dynamic! 

So when Matt Towns contacted me about an article regarding communities that are being super innovative in their urban core planning, I was pretty interested in it! After all, the Road to Domestication can be anywhere! Let’s see what Matt has to say…

Since the end of World War Two, people have been moving out of the cities and into the suburbs. Commuting between home and work was considered an acceptable sacrifice to escape the crowds and problems of urban areas and the American dream settled in the suburbs.

As new generations are born and come of age, however, the dream of near rural living that the baby boomers cherished is passing and cities are, once again, growing in both population and importance. The face of the suburbs has changed from nice houses on nice lots to an endless sprawl of postage stamp sized lots holding the largest house that can fit on it.

Welcome to Suburbia

The wholescale adoption of the automobile and access to easy financing after the war began the trend of sprawl in the suburbs. Prior to that, homes had to be within easy walking distance of mass transit and shops sprang up organically near the transit lines allowing people to shop on their way home from work.

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Automobiles made longer commutes and living further away from shopping centers easier for homeowners. The importance of mass transit declined and the retail stores located near transit lines were forced to compete against chain stores that were not part of their community.

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